• April Thompson, MA, LCMHC

EMDR: A Spiritual Consideration

Over the last two weeks, we have taken a helpful, deeper look into what EMDR is and how it works to help people who are journeying toward psychological, social, and spiritual healing from difficult life experiences. This week, the lens will zoom in to consider an alternative perspective on how EMDR can be used to help someone seeking spiritual healing.


EMDR, being a highly effective, evidence-based tool, can be perceived as grace harvested from the field of secular scientific research to ease the pain of suffering if one chooses to peer from that lens. Living with rapid firing trauma triggers is hard. Working through those trauma triggers is like walking straight into darkness, a fire, or through a valley ridden with dry bones - perhaps sometimes it is like walking through all of those environments at once. However, from a spiritual lens, one knows that in darkness, there is Light; fire purifies; and dry bones can live again. EMDR is merely a tool trained therapists can use to assist you in your journey toward holistic healing. The question I get from people so often is, “Is it really worth it [to engage with the hard work]?” To which I answer a resounding “Yes!” As I seek to come alongside people who are working toward spiritual healing from trauma(s) or other struggles in life, I cannot help but reflect on the freedom I have had the honor to experience and witness.


Through the tool that is EMDR, one can actively be transformed by the renewing of their mind via bilateral stimulation, neuroplasticity, cortical thickening, and re-storing the information through the adaptive information processing model. While the science is fun and exciting, the spiritual encounter is far more awe striking. When someone surrenders their will and power – letting go of those Core Negative Beliefs - to begin adapting to what is True; then they are able to experience holistic freedom.


If you would like more information on EMDR, please reach out to one of our EMDR trained counselors: Joy Tanner, April Thompson, Bailey Wilkinson, Harper O’Neill, Hannah Whisler, or Abby Anspach.



40 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All